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Posts Tagged ‘Bullying’

Sadly I have once again been contacted by people who have been bullied for the very bizarre reason that they have Red Hair.

Here are out some basic practical tips, phone numbers and websites you can use for dealing with bullying.

Please note the sites and numbers only relate to the UK.

If you are being bullied always remember – you are not alone and there is always someone willing to listen and help.

What is bullying?

Bullying can be physical, verbal or psychological. It includes behaviour such as name calling, spreading hurtful rumours, excluding someone from groups, taking possessions or money, hitting, pushing or kicking and unwanted sexual touch. Cyberbullying has the same effect as face to face bullying but takes place over the internet or through phones.

Bullying is often driven by prejudice and can be targeted at someone’s gender, culture, religion or perceived sexuality. Children and young people may also find themselves a target because of a disability, disfigurement, illness or hair colour.

What can I do if I’m being bullied?

  • Firstly please understand – IT IS NOT YOUR FAULT. Whatever the person, or people bullying you have said, this is everything to do with their negative thoughts and behaviour, and NOTHING to do with you. 
  • Talk to someone. Problems rarely get better by keeping them inside. If you can, talk to an adult that you trust – like your parent or a teacher. Talk to friends that you trust. Or, if you are scared of what might happen if you tell your parent or a friend, then contact Childline (see details below).
  • Protect yourself – if you can, avoid situations where you are likely to be bullied. Never retaliate with violent actions such as hitting or punching – this can lead to you being seriously hurt or getting in trouble yourself. If the bullying is online, block or unfriend contacts that are being abusive. Make sure you have the highest privacy settings.If you are not sure how to do this then ask for help.
  • Take part in activities that help to raise your confidence and make you feel good about yourself. Some ideas could include Guides and Scouts, cadets, drama and dance classes, art classes, exercise classes and swimming. Remember that you deserve the very best in life.
  • If the bullying is making you feel very desperate and scared then don’t take it out on yourself – get immediate help. You can contact Childline any time, night or day for support and advice.

If you need help or advice about bullying there are helplines and websites that can provide you with information and support:

Helplines

ChildLine – ChildLine is the UK’s free, confidential helpline for children and young people. They offer advice and support, by phone and online, 24 hours a day. Whenever and wherever you need them, they’ll be there. Call 0800 1111

Cybermentors – CyberMentors is a safe social networking site providing information and support for young people affected by bullying.

EACH  – EACH has a freephone Actionline for children experiencing homophobic bullying: 0808 1000 143. It’s open Monday to Friday 10am-5.00pm

PLEASE REMEMBER THERE IS SOMEONE THERE FOR YOU

 

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You hear me

Then heed me!

And other nights of his dinner

Hitting the wall.

To be picked up and eaten with fingers

Namm namm….

 

Two brothers would be wise enough to be offside

My sister and I instead too damn like him to cower

A younger one, God love her

Never concerned him enough to talk to

Nor to pick on

Just the odd stray snarl

Of the beast caged in dark bars

Our Mum always a target

 

Try not to antagonise him as he’d maybe pick on someone else

Seeing your family suffer being much worse than

Being under the Dull Stupid Bloody lash

Of his forked tongue

 

You damn fool

We were your kin

While you were digging out

All we wanted was that you dug in

When they dug the hole for your ashes

Who of us there could pray

‘Our Father who art in heaven…..’

That first line had us all stumped

 

But I know it’s either

‘Love or destruction’

In this life we do get to struggle and to choose

 

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“I was a victim of bullying back in school. My advice is to always tell someone straight away and ask for help. Keeping it to yourself will only be more damaging in the long run.” Liam Payne, One Direction.

Louis Evans was picked on and taunted throughout his schooldays for his bright ginger hair has beaten the bullies by creating a successful modelling career for himself. Louis has appeared on the catwalks of London Fashion Week and in the pages of British Vogue.

And it was his ginger hair, which was the reason he was bullied for years, that has made him so popular!

louis

Louis Evans As A Schoolkid And Today

Whilst growing up he was targeted for the way he looked. ‘It was quite difficult growing up in a small town. People are very close-minded. Back at home there were stereotypes about gingers.  I didn’t let it affect me though and I tried not to let it affect my confidence.’

Some Tips On How To Deal With Bullying

If you or a friend are being bullied, it can sometimes feel like nothing can make it stop, especially if it has been happening for a long time.

Here are some practical tips, phone numbers and websites you can use for dealing with bullying.

If you are being bullied always remember – you are not alone and there is always someone willing to listen and help.

What is bullying?

Bullying can be physical, verbal or psychological. It includes name calling, spreading hurtful rumours, excluding someone from groups, taking possessions or money, hitting, pushing or kicking and unwanted sexual touch. Cyberbullying has the same effect as face to face bullying but takes place over the internet or through phones.

Bullying is often driven by prejudice and can be targeted at someone’s gender, culture, religion or perceived sexuality. Children and young people may also find themselves a target because of a disability, disfigurement, illness or hair colour.

What can I do if I’m being bullied?

  • Firstly it is not your fault! Whatever the person, or people bullying you have said, this is everything to do with their negative thoughts and behaviour, and nothing to do with you. Believe that you deserve better and seek help.
  • Talk to someone. Problems rarely get better by keeping them inside. If you can, talk to an adult that you trust – like your parent or a teacher.
  • Talk to friends that you trust. Or contact Childline (see details below).
  • Protect yourself – if you can, avoid situations where you are likely to be bullied. Never retaliate with violent actions such as hitting or punching – this can lead to you being seriously hurt or getting in trouble yourself. If the bullying is online, block or unfriend contacts that are being abusive. Make sure you have the highest privacy settings.If you are not sure how to do this then ask for help.
  • Take part in activities outside of school – or wherever the bullying is taking place, that help to raise your confidence and make you feel good about yourself. Some ideas could include Guides and Scouts, cadets, drama and dance classes, art classes, exercise classes and swimming. Remember that you deserve the very best in life.
  • If the bullying is making you feel very desperate and scared then don’t take it out on yourself – get immediate help. You can contact Childline any time, night or day for support and advice.

If you need help or advice about bullying there are helplines and websites that can provide you with information and support:

Helplines

ChildLine – ChildLine is the UK’s free, confidential helpline for children and young people. They offer advice and support, by phone and online, 24 hours a day. Whenever and wherever you need them, they’ll be there. Call 0800 1111.

Cybermentors – CyberMentors is a safe social networking site providing information and support for young people affected by bullying.

EACH  – EACH has a freephone Actionline for children experiencing homophobic bullying: 0808 1000 143. It’s open Monday to Friday 10am-5.00pm.

REMEMBER YOU ARE NEVER ALONE AND THERE IS ALWAYS SOMEONE READY TO LISTEN AND HELP

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Hello,

Last month I wrote about – “National Kick A Ginger Day” after Ginger haired kids in a Yorkshire school were set upon by other pupils. Purely because they had ginger hair.

You can read the post in here in full

I was worried that in the future we would hear how this concoction of physical and cyber bullying will lead to serious injury to an innocent kid who happens to be Ginger – but it is OK  – it was only done “for a laugh” and “no harm was meant.”

Simon Walters, below was just 14 years of age when he hung himself in his Smethwick home last October because of taunts and abuse from other pupils about his ginger hair. 

Simon Walters who committed suicide in October last year

I would like to point out the “Kick A Ginger Day” is still scheduled for November 20th and there remain Facebook accounts open to promote this nonsense.

Twitter has a #kickagingerday thread doing the rounds now.

Please contact Facebook to close these pages down and also Tweet to counter the thoughtless nonsense on  #kickagingerday .

A tasteless joke is spiralling out of control. It is only a hair colour after all.

Thanks

For  confidential  support call the Samaritans in the UK on 08457 90 90 90.

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Hello,

I do a regular post (you can read it here) to help red headed kids who contact Gingerfightback about being bullied. The advice aims to help kids understand that they are not alone and the importance of talking to someone about what they are experiencing.

A friend informed me about an article that has appeared in the Press – “National Kick A Ginger Day”.  The article can be read here Basically, Ginger kids in a Yorkshire school were set upon by other pupils.

This story got me thinking.

When I was at school I was teased (or bullied – call it what you will) for having the glory that is ginger hair. As this was a few years ago, my response was usually a flailing right hook or a kick in the knackers to the perpetrator.

“Standing Up” to bullies is often the advice that you hear today.

However, when every ginger kid in a school is targeted by other pupils, the idea of standing up for yourself becomes tricky. The impact of a group dynamic and a systemic approach to abuse is not only macabre but also sinister. When the accelerants of Twitter, Facebook etc are added to this mix, the methods behind “National Kick A Ginger Day” will soon become custom and practice. Violence will accompany verbal abuse.

I worry that in the weeks, months and years to come we will hear how this concoction of physical and cyber bullying will lead to serious injury to an innocent kid who happens to be Ginger – but it is OK  – it was only done “for a laugh” and “no harm was meant.”

If kids were singled out and attacked because they were Jewish or Muslim or Catholic or Pakistani or Bengali, we would be talking hate crime.  If this took place in a school (presumably the Nick Griffin Free School – lavishly funded by that gleaming turd Michael Gove) – all hell would break loose and well-meaning intellectual fops would be decrying the death of childhood in modern-day Britain.

But it is happening and I fear the cat is out of the bag. Like a modern-day cyber version of Lord Of The Flies. Jolly japes that will be constantly ratcheted up.

So, as I would probably pull a hamstring trying to kick these perpetrators and their parents in the knackers I have;

  • Written to the school asking them to outline what punishment has been handed out to the kids involved and what steps they are taking to prevent this recurring.
  • Asked Facebook to close down “Kick A Ginger Day” pages and sites.

If you can spare the time to contact Facebook about this issue – I would be very grateful. Ironically Facebook has nominated October as bullying prevention month!

It is only a hair colour after all.

Cheers

And remember – BETTER A REDHEAD THAN A DEADHEAD!

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Crazy as it sounds, people are bullied because they have had the fortune to be blessed with Red Hair!

To help you, here are some practical tips, phone numbers and websites you can use for dealing with bullying.

If you are being bullied always remember – you are not alone and there is always someone willing to listen and help.

What is bullying?

Bullying can be physical, verbal or psychological. It includes behaviour such as name calling, spreading hurtful rumours, excluding someone from groups, taking possessions or money, hitting, pushing or kicking and unwanted sexual touch. Cyberbullying has the same effect as face to face bullying but takes place over the internet or through phones.

Bullying is often driven by prejudice and can be targeted at someone’s gender, culture, religion or perceived sexuality. Children and young people may also find themselves a target because of a disability, disfigurement, illness or hair colour.

What can I do if I’m being bullied?

  • Firstly you need to understand that it is not your fault. Whatever the person, or people bullying you have said, this is everything to do with their negative thoughts and behaviour, and nothing to do with you. Believe that you deserve better and seek help.
  • Talk to someone. Problems rarely get better by keeping them inside. If you can, talk to an adult that you trust – like your parent or a teacher. Talk to friends that you trust. Or, if you are scared of what might happen if you tell your parent or a friend, then contact Childline (see details below).
  • Protect yourself – if you can, avoid situations where you are likely to be bullied. Never retaliate with violent actions such as hitting or punching – this can lead to you being seriously hurt or getting in trouble yourself. If the bullying is online, block or unfriend contacts that are being abusive. Make sure you have the highest privacy settings.If you are not sure how to do this then ask for help.
  • Take part in activities outside of school – or wherever the bullying is taking place, that help to raise your confidence and make you feel good about yourself. Some ideas could include Guides and Scouts, cadets, drama and dance classes, art classes, exercise classes and swimming. Remember that you deserve the very best in life.
  • If the bullying is making you feel very desperate and scared then don’t take it out on yourself – get immediate help. You can contact Childline any time, night or day for support and advice.

If you need help or advice about bullying there are helplines and websites that can provide you with information and support:

Helplines

ChildLine – ChildLine is the UK’s free, confidential helpline for children and young people. They offer advice and support, by phone and online, 24 hours a day. Whenever and wherever you need them, they’ll be there. Call 0800 1111

Cybermentors – CyberMentors is a safe social networking site providing information and support for young people affected by bullying.

EACH  – EACH has a freephone Actionline for children experiencing homophobic bullying: 0808 1000 143. It’s open Monday to Friday 10am-5.00pm

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Although Gingerfightback is (hopefully) somewhere you visit for entertainment and laughter, we have had a number of people get in touch who have experienced bullying because they have had the fortune to be blessed with Red Hair!

We have trawled through the web to find some practical tips, phone numbers and websites you can use for dealing with bullying.

If you are being bullied always remember – you are not alone and there is always someone willing to listen and help.

What is bullying?

Bullying can be physical, verbal or psychological. It includes behaviour such as name calling, spreading hurtful rumours, excluding someone from groups, taking possessions or money, hitting, pushing or kicking and unwanted sexual touch. Cyberbullying has the same effect as face to face bullying but takes place over the internet or through phones.

Bullying is often driven by prejudice and can be targeted at someone’s gender, culture, religion or perceived sexuality. Children and young people may also find themselves a target because of a disability, disfigurement or illness.

What can I do if I’m being bullied?

  • Firstly you need to understand that it is not your fault. Whatever the person, or people bullying you have said, this is everything to do with their negative thoughts and behaviour, and nothing to do with you. Believe that you deserve better and seek help.
  • Talk to someone. Problems rarely get better by keeping them inside. If you can, talk to an adult that you trust – like your parent or a teacher. Talk to friends that you trust. Or, if you are scared of what might happen if you tell your parent or a friend, then contact Childline (see details below).
  • Protect yourself – if you can, avoid situations where you are likely to be bullied. Never retaliate with violent actions such as hitting or punching – this can lead to you being seriously hurt or getting in trouble yourself. If the bullying is online, block or unfriend contacts that are being abusive. Make sure you have the highest privacy settings.If you are not sure how to do this then ask for help.
  • Take part in activities outside of school – or wherever the bullying is taking place, that help to raise your confidence and make you feel good about yourself. Some ideas could include Guides and Scouts, cadets, drama and dance classes, art classes, exercise classes and swimming. Remember that you deserve the very best in life.
  • If the bullying is making you feel very desperate and scared then don’t take it out on yourself – get immediate help. You can contact Childline any time, night or day for support and advice.

If you need help or advice about bullying there are helplines and websites that can provide you with information and support:

Helplines

ChildLine – ChildLine is the UK’s free, confidential helpline for children and young people. They offer advice and support, by phone and online, 24 hours a day. Whenever and wherever you need them, they’ll be there. Call 0800 1111

Cybermentors – CyberMentors is a safe social networking site providing information and support for young people affected by bullying.

EACH  – EACH has a freephone for children experiencing homophobic bullying: 0808 1000 143. It’s open Monday to Friday 10am-5.00pm

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